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Table Tennis Facts

Table tennis was banned in the Soviet Union from ca 1930 to 1950. The sport was believed to be harmful to the eyes.

Connors, Dupois, & Morgan (1992). The Olympics Factbook: A spectator's guide to the summer games (p.451). Washington, DC: Visible Ink Press

Table tennis became a medal Olympic sport in the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul.

Connors, Dupois, & Morgan (1992). The Olympics Factbook: A spectator's guide to the summer games (p.449). Washington, DC: Visible Ink Press

Early table tennis paddles were normally made of cork, cardboard, or wood, and covered with cloth, leather or sandpaper.

Connors, Dupois, & Morgan (1992). The Olympics Factbook: A spectator's guide to the summer games (p.449). Washington, DC: Visible Ink Press

Table tennis is the most popular racquet sport in the world and ranked second overall in terms of participation. Over 10 million players compete in sanctioned tournaments each year.

Nelson & MacNee (1996). The Olympics Factbook: A spectator's guide to the summer games (p.505). Washington, DC: Visible Ink Press

A modern table tennis match at the elite level lasts on the average about 30 minutes. Top players often smash the ball at speeds exceeding 100 miles per hour.

Connors, Dupois, & Morgan (1992). The Olympics Factbook: A spectator's guide to the summer games (p.450). Washington, DC: Visible Ink Press

How many balls can two players hit back and forth in 60 seconds? The current record is 173 set by Jackie Bellinger and Lisa Lomas in 1993.

Krebs (1995). The Guiness Book of Sports Records: 1995-1996 (p.198). New York: Guiness Publishing Ltd.

A modern table is 9 feet long, 5 feet wide, and 2.5 feet high. The net is 6 inches high.

Connors, Dupois, & Morgan (1992). The Olympics Factbook: A spectator's guide to the summer games (p.450). Washington, DC: Visible Ink Press

China, Sweden and South Korea are currently the world powers in table tennis.